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The Civil War Letters of Lemuel Glidden

glidden-lemuel

Headstone of Lemuel Glidden (1845-1875) of Co. K, 145th Indiana Vols.

These eighteen letters were written by Lemuel Glidden (1845-1875) of Co. K, 145th Indiana Infantry. Lemuel was the oldest son of Francis (“Frank”) F. Glidden (1826-1865) and Margaret E. Westbrook (1826-1908) who moved from Noble County, Ohio to Indiana in the early 1860s. Lemuel’s father, Frank — in spite of his age (38) and with 8 children to support — was drafted on 19 September 1864 into Co. D, 25th Indiana Infantry and was sent to Marietta, Georgia, where he joined Sherman’s army on their march to Savannah. He was shot and killed by a sniper’s bullet after the Battle of Rivers’ Bridge in South Carolina.

Three days after his father’s death — with the expectation of receiving a township bounty for his enlistment — 20 year-old Lemuel Glidden enlisted in the 145th Indiana Infantry. The regiment was organized very late in the war and its service consisted of a few skirmishes and guard duty. The regiment was mustered in on 16 February 1865. It was ordered to Nashville, Tennessee between February 18 and 21. On February 22, the regiment was moved to Chattanooga and then proceeded to Dalton, Georgia. The regiment was engaged in skirmishes at Spring Place (now Chatsworth, Georgia), on both February 27 and April 20. Skirmishes were fought, by a detachment, near Tunnel Hill, Georgia, on March 3. After the skirmishes at Tunnel Hill, the regiment performed railroad guard duty at Dalton, Marietta and Cuthbert, Georgia until late January, 1866. Lemuel Glidden and Co. K spent at least four months at Bainbridge, Georgia on the Flint River. The regiment was mustered out on January 21, 1866. During its service the regiment incurred sixty-eight fatalities, another fifty-five deserted.

Lemuel did not live long after the war. He died on 29 March 1875 at age 30 and was buried in Bean Blossom or Georgetown Cemetery.

Lemuel’s younger siblings were: Miles Glidden (1847-1919); Martha Glidden (1850-18xx); Lydia (“Lidy”) Ann Glidden (1850-1930), Rhoda E. Gidden (1852-18xx); Russell P. Glidden (1857-1880), James “Taylor” Glidden (1859-1928); and Francis O. Glidden (1863-1883).


LETTER ONE

Camp 145th Regiment
Dalton, Georgia
Monday, April the 3, 1865

Dear mother,

I now embrace the opportunity to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well, hoping these few lines will find you all enjoying the same state of health. I received your letter of the 27th about 10 minutes ago [and] was glad to hear from you all and to hear that you all [were] well [and in] good health. Tis the greatest thing we enjoy. I myself [am] getting as fat as a hog.

I think I will get home about the first of October if the war is as near over as we hear it is here. We heard that Sherman had another fight and had whipped the Rebs like the devil.

I just come off picket this morning. I have been out twist. I seen one Reb while I was out. The Rebs is about played out down here. The cavalry went out day before yesterday and come in yesterday evening and they never found a Reb.

You said you couldn’t get my bonds. I sent my orders last week to you so you could draw the bonds and township bounty too. [Lt.] Frank Taggert says that I am credited to Jackson township and Brown county, Indiana. You get Jesse Williams to go to Columbus with [brother] Miles and tell Stansifer to look over his books and if my name is not on his books, tell him to look over his muster in rolls and he will find my name and let them get a certificate from Stansifer and go to Manville and they can get the bonds and you can get the  township bounty. Send Miles and Jesse Williams soon as you get this before it is everlastingly too late. That is all of that.

You said you wanted to know if I had drawed any bounty. I haven’t drawed any yet and I don’t want to until I am mustered out of the service. If I should happen to draw my bounty, I will send every cent home. You said you wanted me to send my likeness back to you. I could get my likeness taken here but I haven’t any money. They charge 3 dollars to take a picture here.

I will close for this time. Write as soon as this comes to hand. Direct as before:

Lemuel Glidden to Margaret Glidden

Tell Russ and Taylor and Sis and Frank I will bring them all a present when I come home. I weigh 160 pounds. Goodbye.


LETTER TWO

Camp [of the ] 145th Regt. Indiana Vols.
Resaca, Georgia
May 13 [1865]

Margaret Glidden, Morgantown, Indiana
Dear Mother,

I seat myself to pen you a few lines in answer to yours of the 29th which came to hand last night and found me well and in good health. I hope these few lines will find you all well.

We have been marching for 3 days. We moved from Dalton the 2nd of this month down to Resaca and then to Calhoun and stayed there 2 days and marched back to this place. I don’t know how long we will stay here. We will go back to Dalton in a few days. We are ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, they say but I don’t know how it is. Some says we will be mustered out of the service against [ink blob] of June. I hope we will [ink blob] is to be 8,000 Rebs surrendered today at Kingston [ink blob] miles from here to our forces here. The civil law takes affect in this state today. All men found in arms against the United States after today is hung immediately.

I think you will see me at home some time before you are looking for me. I will step in some of these days and take dinner with you. Hugh Lanam ¹ is writing today. We are ordered to Nashville against the 20 of June. I think we will be at home against  the 4th of July. Nothing more but remain your son, — Lemuel Glidden

Direct as before.

¹ Pvt. J. Hugh William Lanam (1836-1900) was from Nashville, Indiana.


LETTER THREE

Camp near Cartersville, Georgia
May the 29, 1865

Dear Mother,

I again take my pen in hand to drop you a few lines to inform you that I am well, hoping these few lines will find you all in the same state of health. I haven’t anything of any importance to write only I expect to stay my time out. They say the one year’s men has to serve their time out. I don’t care a damn. I can stand it if they can. If I keep my health all the time as I have so far, W would as leave stay as not.

There was 5,000 men went through this place yesterday on their way home, I just come in from drill and I am so nervous I can’t write. I am seeing good times here. Nothing much to do, but I would like to be at home in time to cut our wheat. Some of the officers thinks we won’t be here in one week from yesterday. We are in the State of Georgia. I hope we won’t [stay]. I want to be traveling if I have to stay my time out. I want to see the country.

The wagon train just come in from Dalton loaded with provisions and clothing. There is some talk of us going to be mounted infantry. I think if we get horses, we will go to Texas to send to General Kirby Smith. The mail they say has come in and I will quit writing to see if I get a letter. No letters from home for me. I haven’t got a letter from home for 10 days. The reason is the mail hasn’t come in for 5 days before.

All the boys is well and in fine spirits. I haven’t nothing more to write.

Lemuel Glidden to all the family

May the 29th 1865

To Miss Martha Glidden — I wrote you a few lines in answer of yours which come to hand and found me well. I hope those few lines will find you well. I expect there is plenty of boys out there now. I would like to know what one you have picked out or have you any? Tell all the girls and boys I would like to hear from them all. I expect if you would see some of the boys down here you would think they was the handsomest boys you ever seen. Tell Liddy I have a boy picked out for her. That is Jim Smith. ¹ He is a good soldier and handsome as a picture. Write [me]. Direct to Co. K, 145 Regt. Indiana Volunteers. Write soon if you please.

¹ James M. Smith was a musician from Morgantown, Indiana.


LETTER FOUR

Cartersville, Georgia
June the 25th 1865

Mrs. Margaret Glidden
Dear Mother,

I once more seat myself to answer your ever welcome letter of the 16th which come to hand yesterday. Your letter found me well. I sincerely hope these few lines will find you all enjoying the same blessing. I have been back from Atlanta 2 weeks and I haven’t received but one letter from home and that I got last night. You must not write very often. If you do, I don’t get your letters. I write twice a week to some of you.

The boys all think they will all be at home against the first of August but I think they are entirely mistaken. Hugh Lanam thinks we will be back to Old Brown [County] then. There is some talk of us leaving here this week but I don’t think we will leave here till we start north. They are mustering out all one-year’s men and if this is so, it will give us a [hard life?] I have been trying to get a furlough to come home and help cut the harvest but it’s played out. I don’t care about coming home till my time is out — let that be soon or long. Unless I am discharged. [And] that, I know, I won’t be for I am getting so fat. The boys all say I am getting as fat as a hog. I think I will weigh 170 pounds. Little Jim Smith that I came to the army with me — him and Tom Hudiburgh is the best little fellow I ever seen. Hudiburgh & me has bunked together ever since we come here. ¹

Write soon. This is, — Lemuel Glidden


¹ James M. Smith of Morgantown and Thomas Hudiburgh of Bean Blossom were the musicians of Co. K, 145th Indiana Infantry.


LETTER FIVE

Cartersville, Georgia
June 28th, 1865

Dear Mother & Brothers and Sisters,

I sit down to pen you a few lines to let you know that I am well & hoping these few lines will find you all well & doing well. I haven’t got but 2 letters from home for 6 or 7 weeks. I was looking for one this evening when the train come in but it didn’t [come] & I thought I would write and see if you was alive or not.

I will tell you what a good dinner I had today. I had green beans [and] new potatoes. We had all we could eat. You said you would have potatoes against July. I have had potatoes down here for 4 or 5 weeks and peas and beans.

I heard today that there was to be 200,000 men mustered out immediately. I think that will take the Old Bloody 145th Regt. in out of the D_y. I will be at home against the first of December anyhow if not sooner which I think I will. I want you to tell me whether Levi Abbey ¹ has got home yet or not and William Terhune.

We are under marching orders now. I don’t know when we will leave. I don’t know where we will go but I think we will go North when we leave. I want you to send me some postage stamps, if you will. I am going to send Russ and Taylor five dollars apiece in Confederate scrip. I want you to send me a Journal — the latest one you can get.

I will close for this time. write soon. — Lemuel Glidden

To all the family. Direct to Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt., Indiana Vols. Infantry, Cartersville, Ga.

Russ and Taylor. Here is five dollars apiece for you. — Lemuel

¹ Both Pvt. Levi Abbey (1838-1891) and Pvt. William Terhune served in Co. D, 25th Indiana Infantry. Levi was mustered out of the service on 4 June 1865. William was captured in South Carolina in February 1865 and not mustered out until 24 July 1865.


LETTER SIX

Marietta, Georgia
July the 10, 1865

Dear mother,

I seat myself to answer your letter of the 3rd which come to hand yesterday. Your letter found me well. I hope these few lines will find you enjoying the same health.

I have nothing of any importance to write — only I am now stationed here at this place. We came here Saturday ____ I come & several others. We had orders. 5 companies of our regiment to march Saturday morning for this place distance 25 miles.

I marched 5 miles and jumped on the cars and came on through. Hugh Lanam marched all the way. He got here last night. I didn’t like to march so I thought I would ride. I like soldiering so well that I have a notion of going into the Regular Army. I haven’t finally decided my mind yet. You said I wrote to Martha that you could get me out of the army. I don’t want you to try it for everybody would find it out and would think that I wrote to you to get me out. I like soldiering the best kind. I expect every person knows what I wrote to Martha in regard to you getting me out of the service. I wouldn’t for anything in the world for people to find it out. The reason I wrote that was because you wrote like Miles wasn’t at home & [I] thought I would tell you how you could get me out of the army that you heard nobody to look to for support that father got killed in the army & left a large family & you had no person to look to for a support but me & if you tried it, it would cost you 20 or 25 dollars. I don’t want you ever to let anybody know that I wrote this to you.

I am camped 2 miles from Kenesaw Mountain in a good, healthy place, I think. I got a letter from [brother] Miles the other day & he said you got a letter from granddad with one hundred dollars in it. I want to know how much he got for that oil well. I would of wrote to Miles before this time but haven’t any paper nor envelopes. The reason I don’t write oftener is I haven’t any paper. I traded a stamp for a sheet of paper and envelope this morning to write to you, The is the last sheet of paper I have. I want you to send me 50 cts. worth of letter paper and 50 cts. worth of envelopes and some stamps, if you will. If you send them, take them to Old Griffy ¹ & tell where you want to send them. I don’t get half of your letters. The reason is you don’t make the letters right. Get Grifen to back your letters after this. I get every letter that Grifen backs. All of my letters that I get from home that Martha or Miles back goes to Co. H — they make a K so much like an H.

Miles, I want to write what regiment Uncle belongs to and what company. I can get to Chattanooga anytime. I will go up and see him. I want to know anything of Sim St. John, I have wrote to them but never received any answer. Hugh Lanam & me still bunk together yet.

I will close for this time hoping to hear from you soon.

Direct to Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Indiana Vols., Marietta, Georgia

— Lemuel Glidden

Send them envelopes and paper and stamps.

¹ I believe “Old Griffy” was Reuben H. Griffith (1797-1871) of Morgantown, Brown county, Indiana. He was an attorney and notary public used by the Gladden family.


LETTER SEVEN

Marietta, Georgia
July the 19, 1865

Miss Lida Glidden
Dear Sister,

This evening finds me seated at the desk trying to pen you a few lines in answer of yours of the 13th which came to hand last night & found me well & doing well. And I hope these few lines will find you enjoying the same good blessing.

Well, Lidda, I was surprised to get a letter from you. I had been away from home 5 months & had never heard from you nor Rhoda & had come to the conclusion that you had forgotten me but somehow still it seems like you are ______.

Well, Lida, we have been moving our camp today & all the boys are fixing up their tents while I am writing this letter. There is some of the prettiest little boys in this regiment you ever seen, I think you had better wait & get a little soldier for a man. You said that Colston Ogden & Frank Hutchinson was come in to our house Sunday night. You & Rhoda had better sick Tod on Colston ____ for Jim. You mustn’t let nobody get married till I come home & then we will have some fun.

Well, Lidda, I think this regiment will be mustered out in about 3 months & then I will come home to see you all. I am as fat as Miles is. I don’t think you would know me if you would meet me in the road.

I got a letter from Sim the other day & they were all well at home. With these few remarks, I will bring my scribbling to a close hoping to hear from you soon.

Lemuel Glidden to his sister, Lida A. Glidden

Well Rhoda, a few lines to you. I am just going to supper in a few minutes. Rhoda, I am going to have some meat & some coffee, onions & hard tack & beans & rice & several other things. I wanted to mention, Rhoda, there is a lot of little negroes boys here about. They’re your size. It would make you laugh to see them roll up their white eyes & see their white teeth.

You & Lida must be good girls & obey your mother for she is your nearest friend.

— Lemuel Glidden

Russ & Taylor, be good boys & I will fetch you a new cap when I come home. Sirey, you must have me a chicken for supper when I come home. — Lemuel

Direct to Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Ind. Vols., Marietta, Georgia. Write soon.

Tell mother I will write to her tomorrow.


LETTER EIGHT

Marietta, Georgia
July the 23rd, 1865

Dear mother,

With pen in hand I drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and enjoying good health. I hope when these few lines come to hand, they will find you all enjoying good health.

I haven’t nothing of any importance to write his time. Frank Taggart ¹ got back last night. He was at home on a 20 day furlough and just got home last night. The boys acted like they was glad to see him, There is a great deal of talk of us coming home against the first of October but I don’t know how it will [be] determined. I wouldn’t take a discharge if they would give it to me without the regiment was all discharged. Hugh Lanam got a letter from his wife last night & she stated that Jim Bass was dead & old doctor McKee was dead.

I am on guard today but we don’t have anything to do since the old Rebel General [William Tatum] Wofford surrendered at Kingston. I haven’t been sick a day since I left Indiana. I haven’t missed going on guard but once since I left home & I am getting as fat as you please. Frank Taggart says he thinks we will be discharged against the middle of September. If I don’t get home in time to cut wheat, I want you to have a good crop of wheat put in this fall.

I haven’t got a letter from you for 3 weeks. I got a letter from Lida 1 week ago. I haven’t heard what regiment Uncle Knipes [?] was in yet. There was 3 other regiments left Chattanooga Wednesday morning for Nashville to be mustered out. He may be in one of those regiments. There was a regiment went up toward Nashville this morning at daylight. I didn’t hear what regiment it was. The old citizens are making a devil of a fuss about the boys taking their peaches & apples & raspberries but they can’t help themselves. Some of the boys of our neighborhood got in a fuss the night of the 4th [of July] but I didn’t understand what they done nor who it was.

I want to know what they are doing about that township bounty. With these few lines I will close for the present. Write soon.

— Lemuel Glidden

to his mother Margaret Glidden

I will send 5 dollars of Confederate money. Write soon David.

To Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Ind. Vol., Marietta, Ga.

¹ Franklin P. Taggart was the 2d Lieutenant of Co. K, 145th Indiana Infantry. He was from Georgetown, Indiana.


LETTER NINE

Macon, Georgia
July the 31st 1865

Dear Mother,

This morning [I will] try to pen you a few lines to inform you that I am well and in good spirits. I hope these few lines will find you all in good health.

I am now in the city of Macon. This is the prettiest place I have seen in the South. This is the place where the Rebs starved so many of our men to death while imprisoned. ¹ Our regiment came here yesterday evening. We are going to leave at 12 o’clock. Where, I can’t tell but I think likely we will go to Florida. That is the talk now. 300 miles from here. I believe I will get to see the so called Southern Confederacy — the most of it. I am in hopes so. The ride is to Uncle Sam’s expense. It don’t cost me anything.

This is the hottest country you ever seen. I am writing this right in the sun. You better believe the sun comes down hot. Well, we was paid off Saturday evening. I drawed $44.00 dollars & sent 40.00 dollars to you. I expressed it to Thomas M. Adams in Nashville [Indiana]. You will have to go to Nashville and get it — forty dollars. There was thirteen hundred dollars expressed to Adams. You will have to go yourself to Nashville and get the money or else get an order wrote and send Miles and sign your name to this order and then Miles can get it. Go as soon as you get this letter and get it and write to me.

I will close for this time and I will give you the full particulars of my ride through Georgia when we get settled. Write soon for your letters will follow the regiment.

— Lemuel Glidden to his mother Margaret Glidden

Direct to Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Indiana Vols., Macon, Georgia. If not there, follow the regiment.

I am afraid I will have to send this letter without a stamp for Hugh Lanam is carrying them and he is not here now. I got that paper and envelopes and stamps Saturday you sent me. I sent some clothes home. You will have to go over to Josh Brummet’s ² wife [Mary] and get them. I expect they are there against you get this letter. You will have to pay a third of the freight to Josh Brummet’s wife.

¹ Glidden is referring to Camp Oglethorpe which the Confederate government enlisted as a prison camp for federal POWs. It was located near the Ocmulgee River at the “old fairgrounds.”

² Pvt. Joshua Brummet (1824-1895) was from Bean Blossom, Indiana. He was married to Mary West Prosser (1833-1923) in 1850. 


LETTER TEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
August the 8th 1865

Dear Mother,

I seat myself to drop you a few lines to inform you of my whereabouts. I am in Bainbridge, Georgia, about 1100 miles from home. I am well & hearty. I hope these few lines will find you all well and enjoying good health.

I will give you a history of our trip. We left Marietta, Georgia, on the evening of the 29 of July, came to Atlanta, stayed over night, [and] next morning we started to Macon 150 miles. We arrived there in the evening of the 30th. There we stayed overnight. The next day [at] 12 o’clock, we got on the cars and started south but we didn’t know where we was going that night. At twelve o’clock we arrived at Andersonville. Stayed there one hour and we started on the 1st of this month we arrived at Cuthbert, Georgia. There we struck tents. We hadn’t been there more than one hour till there was an order for four companies to come to this place.

That same evening we started. We stopped at Eufaula, Alabama. We stayed there 2 days till the morning of the 3rd of this month and then we took a boat [and] rode one day. We got off the boat the same evening of the 3rd and then we had to march 30 miles. We started about sundown. We marched till 11 o’clock and we camped for the night. The next morning at 9 o’clock we started on our march. We marched 7 miles and camped for the day. The same evening we come on our march, we marched till 10 o’clock and camped in one mile from this place. The next morning we crossed the [Flint] river and camped in this place where [we] are now stationed. How long we will stay here, I can’t tell but I hope not long. This is the damnedest hole I have seen in Georgia.

This is the first letter I have wrote since I started from Macon. There has never been any soldiers here. What we come here for, I can’t tell at the present. I have seen enough of the South. I would like to go to Savannah, Georgia, before I come back home — that is all the place I want to see while I am out. We have been here 2 days and have no chance to send letters [so] if you don’t get letters from me you mustn’t get uneasy about me for I am all right.

I am doing provost duty now. Last night was the first night I have slept in a house since the 18th of March. I have a good home to stay in as long as we stay here. I and Josh Brummet are both provost guards and we have a nice company.


LETTER ELEVEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
August the 20th 1865

Dear mother,

I this fine Sunday morning find me seated to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hearty. I sincerely hope these few lines will find you all in the same blessing.

I received your letter yesterday that was wrote the 7th. I was truly glad to hear that you was all well and that you had the best tobacco in the country. I hope you will get it all strung before the frost kills it. I understand that there is has been a very well [?] season there this summer. It is all for the better on the bacon but not so good on the wheat. I want you to tell me whether you have got the wheat hauled in yet or not and threshed. tell me how the corn looks — if the corn is pretty good in that new ground that we cleaned out the first year we came on that place.

I will tell you that I received a letter from Uncle Bill Westbrook ¹ yesterday. Also a few lines from Harriet Westbrook. They was all well. Uncle Bill said that Aunt Rose Ann was dead and Uncle Tom was not likely to live. I didn’t understand what was the matter with them. William Shepherd Westbrook’s has kin in the army and has got home. Uncle Bill’s folks talked like they would like to see your son Lemuel and if ever come out to Ohio, I must come and see them. Harriet, I think, is a good girl. I am going to write to her Tuesday. I also got a letter from Benoman Brothers yesterday and his family was well. He said he had in 8 acres of tobacco and it was fit to top. He said Uncle Jack was at home and he was in 26 engagements while he was in the service and never got a scratch but once.

Josh Brummet got a letter yesterday from his wife and she said that you had got my clothes. I was glad of that for I thought they never would go through.

I want you to tell me whether you ever got my money that I sent to Nashville [Indiana[ for you. With these few lines, I will close. Hoping to hear from you all soon.

— Lemuel Glidden to Mother. Give my love and best respects to all enquiring friends. I want you to send me 25 cts. worth of stamps and I won’t ask you for to send me anymore. Tell me all the news.

¹ William (“Bill”) A. Westbrook (1816-1894) was married to Maria A. White (1814-1893) and resided in Graysville, Monroe county, Ohio in 1860. Bill and Maria had a daughter named Harriet A. Westbrook (1843-1917) who would have been Lemuel’s first cousin.


LETTER TWELVE

Bainbridge, Georgia
September the 9th 1865

Dear Mother,

I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well and I sincerely hope that these few lines will find you also well.

I haven’t anything of any importance to write. I have been out in the country for 3 days and I just got in yesterday. I was out 33 miles by myself. I was out to discharge some negroes. I haven’t heard any news since I come to this place till last night. I heard that there was several new regiments that come out since this regiment came out [have been] mustered out. I understand that the 153rd Regiment is going to be mustered out soon. I think it will come our turn some of these days. I think we will leave this place next month.

You said new wheat was worth 60 cts. per bushel. I think if we won’t have enough to do us, you ought to buy some 25 bushels before it gets higher.

Hugh Lanam is about well. Josh Brummet is sick with the ague. I want you to sow a good crop of wheat this fall. I got a letter from Uncle William Westbrook some two weeks ago and also one from Harriet. I haven’t heard from grandfather’s folks for 3 months and if they don’t write to me, they can let it alone.

I got a letter from you last night that was wrote the 31st and I got 6 stamps in it.

I haven’t anything much to write so I will close by asking you to write soon. Tell me what Dennis and Frank is doing and whether they have gone back home yet or not.

Direct as before.

— Lemuel Glidden


LETTER THIRTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
September the 24, 1865

Dear Mother,

I this evening try to pen you a few lines to let you know that I am well, hoping these few lines will find you all well.

We are still here in this place and I expect we will stay here till we start for home. How long that will be, I can’t tell but I hope it won’t be long. I think we will get home against Christmas. The talk is that we will be paid off the first of next month. I want to send all the money I can home but we are so far from an Express Office that it will be a great deal of trouble and maybe you wouldn’t get it. But if I draw my money, I will send it and risj it. I don’t want you to let Miles use that colt till its shoulders get well or it will never get well. I want to send enough money home to buy me a horse when I come home.

I have been looking for a letter from Harriet Westbrook for several days. I think I will get one the next mail. I want you to see that the crops is taken care of and saved. Tell Martha I want to know who it is that will be married when I come home. If there is anything of that kind going on, I want to be on hand when it goes off. I think Hugh Lanam will get a discharge some of these days. I hope he will for I don’t want any man to stay in the service when he hain’t fit for duty. I think he will make the trip through.

We see a nice time here, sure as you are alive. I understand that the 9th Cavalry is mustered out. Tell me whether Jacob Gross has got home or not. John Bonuff is mustered out of the service. The 10th Cavalry is mustered out and I think the 145th Regiment will come in next.

With these few lines, I will close for the present hoping to hear from you soon.

— Lemuel Glidden

Direct as before.

Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Ind. Vols. Infantry, Bainbridge, Georgia


LETTER FOURTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
October the 10, 1865

Dear mother,

It is with pleasure that I attempt to drop you a few lines to inform you that I am well and I trust these few lines will reach their proper place and find you all well, I have just ate my dinner. I will tell you what I had for dinner — friend crackers, fried pork, and a cup of strong coffee. That is more than O commonly eat for the meat is so fat that I can’t eat it. But I keep hearty. We have a good many sweet potatoes to eat. Sometimes we have beans and sometimes beef. We never have beef without we buy it. It is about what we get to eat. There is plenty of sweet potatoes in this country and we will live well as long as they last. But I don’t think we will have long to stay in this section of country. I don’t think we will stay out this winter. The election goes off in this State tomorrow and I think we will start home about the last of this month but I won’t be deceived. Soldiering is a very uncertain game.

I haven’t hear from home for 2 weeks. I hope there isn’t anything the matter. We are looking to be paid off every day but I don’t think we will get our money as soon as some of the boys thinks we will. I don’t want to get any of my money till I start home to stay. I have sold my bonds to Capt. [Volney Patterson] Mason for $2.50 when I get to Indianapolis. I will quit writing till the mail come in and I will see whether I get a letter from home or not.

This is the 10th and the mail has just come in and I have just received a letter from you that was wrote the [  ] of last month. Yours found me well. I will tell you the election went off all quiet and I think it is time for the damned Rebels to be quit. I received a letter from Harriet Westbrook today and they was all well and I expect to answer the letter tonight.

I expect Hugh Lanam will leave here tomorrow to get a [medical] discharge but he won’t get home for a month yet. I think I will get home this fall sometime. Miles mustn’t think hard for me not writing for I have written to him twice since I have got a letter from him. But [  ] still I will write him a hell of a good letter tomorrow if I have time.

I want you to tell me who that is you have hired to help cut the corn. I could not make out what Jones it was. I want to know what you blotted out them few words for. I would like to know what it was. If there is going to be a wedding, I want to know something. I want you to take good care and don’t spend any more money that you can help and we will buy the Old Skinner place when I come home, I would like to be at home to go to some of them parties.

Mother, I want you to send me some paper and envelopes and stamps, if you please. So I will close. Write soon.

— Lemuel Glidden


LETTER FIFTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
October the 26, 1865

Dear Mother,

I seat myself to answer your letter of the 8th that came to hand this morning and I am found trying to answer. I am well and hearty. I weigh 164 pounds yesterday. I hope this will find you all well. Tell Sis that I will be at home before long [and] that I haven’t but about 3 months yet two serve in this war.

How much did Temp Benson get for his place? and who bought him out? I think you done right in selling them steers for we didn’t want them if they would jump.

There is no news here two write — only Capt. [Volney P.] Mason told me this morning that we would get paid in a few days but we have heard that so often that we don’t believe anything till we know it is so. If we get paid off, I will send my money home — that is, if we get any worthwhile. I think Miles ought to [have] sowed fifteen acres of wheat for I don’t think ten will be enough. Tell me whether you have got all of the tobacco taken in yet or not and how much you had all together. I would like to know if the colt’s shoulders has got entirely well yet or not.

I heard this morning that John Tracy’s brother had bought out old Johnney Prosser and was going to move there. The steamboat by the name of Alice sunk about 30 miles below here yesterday. 21 men drowned. It was the nicest boat I have seen since I have been in the service.

There was a citizen came pretty near getting thrashed a few minutes ago for saying he wanted to sell his plantation and get as far away from the Yankees and Negroes and the boys was going to give him the Devil.

Hugh Lanam has been shaking with the ague. Josh Brummet has had the ague ever since we come here till the last five weeks. He is well. Now tell me whether there has been any frost yet up there. I haven’t seen any frost since I left Indianapolis. This has been a nice fall down here. It hasn’t rained any of any account — dry and nice all the time. It is getting about dark and I will close. I received a letter from Martha today. But I haven’t time to answer it.

–Lemuel Glidden to Margaret Glidden.

Write soon if you please and send me some stamps.


LETTER SIXTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
November 8th 1865

Dear mother,

I write you a few lines to inform you that I am well and I hope these few lines will find you all enjoying the same blessing. I received your letter of the 22nd yesterday and was glad to hear from you. I also received some paper and envelopes and stamps yesterday which came in time of need. I was just out of paper and I think this will do me till I come home. I have nothing of any importance going on here. One of the members of Co. K helped take a bale of cotton and sold it. They got $150.00 for it. He came back to the company last night and this morning he was put under guard and put in the guard house and the citizen that was with him was put in jail. There was a fight just now between two citizens. You had ought to seen the fight go off.

It has been 9 months yesterday since I left the hills of old Brown County and I expect it will [be] 3 months more before I get back and maybe longer. I was surprised to hear of Lib Carter getting married. I thought she would die an old maid but things has turned out different. You said that Russell Carter sent me a paper. If he did, I never got it. I am detailed to go and help cord up some government wood and I will have to close. Hoping to hear from you soon.

— Lemuel Glidden


LETTER SEVENTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
November the 13th 1865

Miles Glidden
Dear Brother,

This morning I seat myself to pen you a few lines to inform you of my health. I am well and I hope these few lines will come safe to hand and find you all well. I haven’t anything strange to write as I know of at this present time. I think if nothing happens, I will get home against my time is out.

There has been two little frosts here this fall. There hasn’t been any cold weather here yet. We can go in our shirt sleeves all the time if we wanted to but the military authorities won’t allow going in our shirt sleeves — especially in town.

Miles, I want you to watch and enquire into that township bounty and as soon as they pay it in, you get mine. There is some talk of us leaving here. Where we will go, I can’t tell. The Major [Henry Winter] said yesterday that we would start home in 3 weeks but we have heard that so much we can’t believe one word we hear. I would like to get home in time to take a good sleigh ride or two and if nothing happens, I think I will.

I received a letter from Frank H___ last week and answered it the same day. The state election goes off here the 15 of this month for the purpose of election of a Governor of the State of Georgia.

We haven’t drawed any winter clothing yet and if we don’t we will see a pretty hard time as we go home as it will be very cold up North and we will go right out of a warm country into a cold one. I haven’t any overcoat — nothing but my blouse and blanket. But I think I can get along. I want you to tell me how the colt’s shoulders are getting [along] and how much corn and tobacco you had give me all the news. This is 3 letters I have written to you since I have received any from you. Tell me who is teaching our school this winter and whether John Skinner is at home or not and where he is.

I will close for this time hoping to hear from you soon.

— Lemuel Glidden


LETTER EIGHTEEN

Bainbridge, Georgia
November the 20th 1865

Dear Mother,

This evening I resume my seat to answer your letter of the 24th which come to hand some two or three days ago and found me well. I trust these few lines will come to hand & find you all well.

I haven’t anything of any importance to write. In the first place, we have been quite busy for the last 3 or five days a hunting government horses and mules. We have had tolerable good luck. We have got 14 horses and several saddles and bridles. We are looking to leave here every day but I can’t tell when we will go. But the talk is mostly about going home. If we don’t get home against Christmas, I don’t want to come till my time is out and that hain’t quite 3 months and when I do come, I think I will ride to Morgantown [   ] from grandfather’s folks for 4 months. I would like to know what has become of them. I heard today that there was to be 25,000 men mustered out of the service against Christmas and I think we will come under that call. I want you to see that the corn is gathered and put away before it gets bad weather. If it hain’t gathered, we will have to [   ] corn next spring and we would have any money to spend for I want you to buy that Skinner farm if we can get it reasonable.

We are seeing good times here. We have plenty to eat and plenty to wear and that is all we need in this part of the world. I want you to tend to that township bounty and get it as soon as you can. I believe I have written all that I can think of and it is about twelve o’clock and I am getting sleepy so I will close for this time hoping to hear from you soon. Tell the girls I am all right and think I will get home soon.

— Lemuel Glidden

to Mrs. Margaret Glidden
Direct to Lemuel Glidden, Co. K, 145th Regt. Ind. Vols., Bainbridge, Georgia